Some of my favorite CS Lewis quotes on his birthday

Today, November 29th, marks the birthday of CS Lewis (1898-1963). It'd be hard to overestimate the impact he has had on my life and thinking, the value of which is inestimable. If someone were to offer me a winning ticket to the Powerball lottery in exchange for all that I have learned (and am still learning) from this man, I would not take it. He saw truth vividly, yet simply, and had the unique ability to pass that along to the reader through his writings. I distinctly remember reading Mere Christianity as a new follower of Christ during my freshman year at the University of Washington and thinking: "How is it that I have spent 18 years of my life without knowing of this man and his writings?" If you have not acquainted yourself with Lewis, you are impoverishing your soul (that's not an overstatement). Start with Mere Christianity and read slowly. In honor of Lewis, here are some of my favorite quotes:

I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else.
— from The Weight of Glory
As long as you are proud you cannot know God. A proud man is always looking down on thing and people: and, of course, as long as you are looking down you cannot see something that is above you.
— from Mere Christianity
Reality, in fact, is usually something you could not have guessed. That is one of the reasons I believe Christianity. It is a religion you could not have guessed. If it offered us just the kind of universe we had always expected, I should feel we were making it up. But, in fact, it is not the sort of thing anyone would have made up. It has just that queer twist about it that real things have.
— from Mere Christianity
Relying on God has to begin all over again every day as if nothing had yet been done.
— from Letters to Malcolm
If we find ourselves with a desire that nothing in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that we were made for another world.
— from Mere Christianity
‘Safe? said Mr. Beaver; ‘don’t you hear what Mrs. Beaver tells you? Who said anything about safe? ‘Course he isn’t safe. But he’s good. He’s the King, I tell you.’
— from The Lion, Witch and the Wardrobe
To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact you must give it to no one, not even an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements. Lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket, safe, dark, motionless, airless, it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. To love is to be vulnerable.
— from The Four Loves
I am trying here to prevent anyone saying the really foolish thing that people often say about Him: I’m ready to accept Jesus as a great moral teacher, but I don’t accept his claim to be God. That is the one thing we must not say. A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher. He would either be a lunatic — on the level with the man who says he is a poached egg — or else he would be the Devil of Hell. You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God, or else a madman or something worse. You can shut him up for a fool, you can spit at him and kill him as a demon or you can fall at his feet and call him Lord and God, but let us not come with any patronizing nonsense about his being a great human teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend to.
— from Mere Christianity
It is a good rule after reading a new book, never to allow yourself another new one till you have read an old one in between.
— from God in the Dock
Some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.
— from The World's Last Night: And Other Essays
There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, ‘Thy will be done,’ and those to whom God says, in the end, ‘Thy will be done.’ All that are in Hell, choose it. Without that self-choice there could be no Hell. No soul that seriously and constantly desires joy will ever miss it. Those who seek find. Those who knock it is opened.
— from The Great Divorce
The Christian does not think God will love us because we are good, but that God will make us good because He loves us.
— from Mere Christianity
I didn’t go to religion to make me happy. I always knew a bottle of Port would do that. If you want a religion to make you feel really comfortable, I certainly don’t recommend Christianity.
— from God in the Dock
Christianity, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance, the only thing it cannot be is moderately important.
— from God in the Dock
Pain insists upon being attended to. God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks in our consciences, but shouts in our pains. It is his megaphone to rouse a deaf world.
— from The Problem of Pain
Even in literature and art, no man who bothers about originality will ever be original: whereas if you simply try to tell the truth (without caring twopence how often it has been told before) you will, nine times out of ten, become original without ever having noticed it.
— from Mere Christianity
It would seem that Our Lord finds our desires not too strong, but too weak. We are half-hearted creatures, fooling about with drink and sex and ambition when infinite joy is offered us, like an ignorant child who wants to go on making mud pies in a slum because he cannot imagine what is meant by the offer of a holiday at the sea. We are far too easily pleased.
— from The Weight of Glory