[Review] Tap: Defeating the Sins that Defeat You, by Yancy Arrington, is a book about fighting sin with principles gleaned from the Puritan, John Owen. It’s similar in concept to The Enemy Within, by Kris Lundgaard (highly recommend), but slightly more accessible to the average reader. He unpacks the necessity of identifying: our fight with sin, holds that won’t work (e.g. believing that we’ve arrived, diversion, occasional victory, emotion and busyness), holds that will work (those that weaken, contend and achieve victory over the flesh), the need to repent of our repentance (great chapter), contending well (e.g. hating sin, getting rid of all sin, and waiting for God’s peace), and the role of the gospel (believing before behaving, the gospel and our guilt, the gospel and our love, the gospel and our discipline). Its basic, but serves as a helpful primer for those just starting to explore these issues. FYI: You don’t have to be a fan of MMA to benefit. For those looking for something more, check out Lundgaard - or, even better, Owen himself. “Sins desire is to sap your spiritual vitality, create static in your relationship with God and keep you on the mat of depression and despair as long as you will let it.” (p24) “Christians will only evaluate their repentance by something other than obedience if the repentance they exhibit is pretender’s repentance.” (p79)

[Review] Tap: Defeating the Sins that Defeat You, by Yancy Arrington, is a book about fighting sin with principles gleaned from the Puritan, John Owen. It’s similar in concept to The Enemy Within, by Kris Lundgaard (highly recommend), but slightly more accessible to the average reader. He unpacks the necessity of identifying: our fight with sin, holds that won’t work (e.g. believing that we’ve arrived, diversion, occasional victory, emotion and busyness), holds that will work (those that weaken, contend and achieve victory over the flesh), the need to repent of our repentance (great chapter), contending well (e.g. hating sin, getting rid of all sin, and waiting for God’s peace), and the role of the gospel (believing before behaving, the gospel and our guilt, the gospel and our love, the gospel and our discipline). Its basic, but serves as a helpful primer for those just starting to explore these issues. FYI: You don’t have to be a fan of MMA to benefit. For those looking for something more, check out Lundgaard - or, even better, Owen himself.

“Sins desire is to sap your spiritual vitality, create static in your relationship with God and keep you on the mat of depression and despair as long as you will let it.” (p24)

“Christians will only evaluate their repentance by something other than obedience if the repentance they exhibit is pretender’s repentance.” (p79)